Roseville's new bronze reflects its personality - 10/01/00 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Search detnews.com
GO
(none)

Sunday, October 1, 2000



Site Index
Homepage
Search
CyberSurveys
News Talk
Sports Talk
Lions Talk
Wings Talk
Car Talk
Tech Talk
Horoscope
Hot Sites
Lottery
Weather
Staff

News
Autos
Joyrides
Business
Careers
Columnists
Commuting
Detroit History
Editorials
Health
Metro/State
Livingston
Macomb
Oakland
Wayne
On Detroit
Nation/World
Obituaries
Death Notices
Politics
Real Estate
Religion
Schools
Special Reports
Technology

Sports
Sports Home
Lions/NFL
Pistons/NBA
Red Wings/NHL
Shock/WNBA
Tigers/Baseball
MSU
U-M
More Colleges
Golf
High Schools
Motor Sports
More Sports
Olympics
Scoreboards

Entertainment
Entertainment
Casino Guide
Movie Finder
TV Listings
Crossword
Features
Food
Homestyle
Wine Report

Copyright 2000
The Detroit News.

Use of this site signifies your agreement to the Terms of Service (updated April 17, 2000).


Roseville's new bronze reflects its personality
State grants used to fund 'Rosebuds' sculpture

Image
Max Ortiz / The Detroit News

Artist Janice Trimpe, left, and longtime student Kitty Podsiadly work on 'Rosebuds,' a new bronze being made for display at the Sculpture Garden Plaza in front of Roseville's City Hall, at Trimpe's studio in Grosse Pointe Park. Grants, corporate donations and commemorative bricks will help pay for the $89,000 sculpture.


Image



Supporting local culture
   Other Macomb communities and nonprofit groups will receive grants from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.
   * Macomb Center for Performing Arts: $82,000.
   * Henry Ford II High School: $23,000.
   * Village of New Haven: $19,700.
   * Macomb Intermediate School District: $13,200.
   * Warren Symphony: $9,600.
   * All the World's a Stage: $7,500.
   
By Edward L. Cardenas / The Detroit News

    ROSEVILLE -- When the first piece of public art erected in Roseville goes up next year, Nancy Sunderman-Elert said it will depict the personality of the city.
   The sculpture, titled "Rosebuds," will at least reflect part of the city's name.
   "We are a working-class community where people go to work and take care of their homes and families," said Sunderman-Elert, a member of Roseville's beautification committee. "Now, we have something that will add beauty to the city and be a focal point in the community."
   The art work by Janice Trimpe of Grosse Pointe Park features bronze figures of a mother, father and three children. The piece will be funded by a portion of $326,200 in grants Macomb County received this year from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.
   The grant money is more than three times the $82,000 Macomb cultural and arts groups got in 1999. Macomb traditionally has been underserved when it came to getting state funding for arts projects. The art's council made a commitment this year to ship funding to areas like Macomb, officials said.
   "One of the things the arts council tried to do was to reach out to previously underserved communities," said Lori Donlan, communication specialist for the Department of Consumer and Industry Services, which encompasses the arts council.
   "This outreach really boosts programs in Macomb County. The grants are determined through a peer review process. It is not based on size or other factors. It is based on quality of work and the proposal."
   Trimpe's project was selected by Roseville's beautification committee and Project Art over 16 other statewide submissions by artists. Once completed next fall, the sculpture will be placed on the Sculpture Garden Plaza in front of the soon-to-be remodeled City Hall on VFW Memorial Drive.
   "Local artists have been talking about the possibility of doing this for some time. Now that it is in the works, we are really excited about it," said Kathy Karschnia, assistant to the Roseville city manager.
   Roseville's portion of the state grant money is $21,000, and all will be used toward the $89,000 cost of "Rosebuds." Corporate donations and sales of commemorative bricks are expected to pay the balance.
   Nine other nonprofit organizations countywide also will receive state grants. More than $24 million in grants was distributed in Michigan this year -- an increase of nearly $4 million from 1999.
   The state funding also will help renovate of the historic New Haven railroad depot and send teachers in the Macomb Intermediate School District to classes to help students further their art careers.
   The strong showing by Macomb County organizations in the grant process this year has been attributed to efforts by local officials holding workshops to inform groups about what money is available.
   "When only three or four applications are filed, it is not representative of the county," said Jo-Anne Wilkie, executive director of The Art Center in Mt. Clemens.
   The Art Center, a nonprofit arts educational organization, has taken the lead in raising money and commissioning four works of art that are placed in downtown Mt. Clemens as part of the Art in Public Places project.
   That project has been successful, and has attracted interest from art lovers across the state who want to view the pieces, Wilkie said.
   "I think any time you have a work of public art you have a focus for community and a topic of conversation," Wilkie said. "It really gives identification to the community."
   Trimpe also has created the bronze "Apple of My Eye" sculpture of a grandfather playing checkers with his granddaughter on Macomb Place in Mt. Clemens. It is one of the Art in Public Places pieces.
   Her "Rosebuds" sculpture, which Trimpe is working on in her Grosse Pointe Park studio, is nearly one and a quarter life size and depicts a father carrying his young son on his back, while his wife holds the hand of another son and carries the couple's baby girl.
   The girl is handing a rose to her father.
   "The children are the rosebuds, because the children are the most important ingredient in any society," Trimpe said.
   "One of the things that I am excited about the piece is with so much anger portrayed on television, my art shows the nicer qualities which makes people feel the love and goodness."